UCP-Inc

Unattended Card Payments Inc. (UCP Inc.) is dedicated to providing EMV compliant Hardware and Payment Gateway solutions for Unattended card payment terminals in the North American market.

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27
Jan
0

Security Concerns Will Dominate Payments Space In 2015

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Security Concerns Will Dominate Payments Space In 2015

 

By Thierry Denis, President, Ingenico Group North America

Payment Security Is Brand Security

Ingenico Group works closely with merchants of all sizes in the U.S., and one of the most frequent questions we get from reseller and managed services partners is, “What is the key concern among your merchant customers that we need to address?”

Without a doubt, that key concern is preventing breaches and protecting consumers’ card data.

There were a multitude of large, well-publicized card data breaches in 2014. Some of that may be the natural consequence of the U.S. being the last developed country in the world relying on mag stripe technology. With the impending October 2015 EMV liability shift coming, at long last U.S. merchants are upgrading their payment infrastructure for chip cards, and that may help stem the tide of card reproduction fraud. But merchants are still very concerned, and are looking to ensure that they’re doing everything they can to protect customers’ data and their own reputations.

Stage Stores is one such merchant. This leading neighborhood retailer delivers brand-name family apparel in 40 states across the U.S. The company has implemented point-to-point encryption (P2PE) for its almost 900 stores. Now customers shopping at Stage Stores’ five brands (Bealls, Goody’s, Palais Royal, Peebles and Stage) will conduct their payment transactions on Ingenico terminals that encrypt from the moment the transaction enters the terminal. Stage Stores CIO Steven Hunter says that securing customers’ information is the company’s #1 priority in 2015.

P2PE and tokenization are the best weapons a merchant has against card fraud. P2PE is about protecting data in flight, and tokenization is about protecting data at rest. Every merchant needs P2PE; most (but not all) need tokenization. We believe that virtually all Tier 1 and 2 merchants will have implemented one or both by the end of 2015. Here’s why:

P2PE: Although chip cards make card cloning very difficult, they do not immediately address card data in flight. P2PE is a security solution that helps protect card data while in transit to the merchant’s processor. In a P2PE environment, card data is encrypted at the point of entry so that raw card data is never exposed to internal systems or legible to would-be criminals. It is not decrypted until it reaches the point of processing. When implemented properly, P2PE can help merchants reduce their PCI DSS scope but more importantly it reduces overall risk — which is why it’s so effective.

A simple concept, yet many merchants did not consider implementing P2PE until recently — when bad publicity over card breaches made it dangerous to ignore. It is also a good insertion point for P2PE as many retailers are analyzing their POS systems and terminals in preparation for EMV acceptance.

Tokenization: In the payments world, tokenization is a solution that replaces a customer’s debit or credit card number with a surrogate value (called a token). The token is returned post authorization by the merchant’s payment processor or transaction service provider. Tokens eliminate the need for merchants to store customer card data in their own systems. Many merchants rely on this data for legitimate business reasons like recurring billing and automated returns, but do not want the risk of stored card data as a consequence. Instead, unique tokens are stored and used in place of a card number to process subsequent transactions. Thus, in the event of a merchant data breach, criminals are not able to access actual card data — just encrypted tokens that are meaningless to any entity except the original card processor.

Tokenization has gained interest recently due to its use in Apple Pay as a security feature that substitutes your actual card number in the iPhone with a token that is used when you present a payment. While many are under the impression that Apple invented tokenization, this is not so. Tokenization has been used in the electronic payment and e-commerce worlds for many years. Apple Pay has brought attention to tokenization, which we believe is a good thing, because now both merchants and cardholders are asking about it.

Most payment solutions vendors and processors offer some flavor of P2PE and/or tokenization, making it easy for you to add them to your portfolio. Look for solutions that are already proven in the field and certified for EMV Level 1 & 2 and PCI PTS 3.0 or higher.

Merchants are actively looking for these technologies — in fact they shouldn’t seriously consider a payment solution that doesn’t incorporate the latest security features. That means resellers and managed service providers need to ensure they can provide it.

Thierry Denis is President of Ingenico North America.  He has 20+ years’ experience in the payments technology space. At Ingenico Group, he works closely with merchants, processors and acquirers to help them implement secure and seamless end-to-end payment solutions.

 

Link to original content: http://www.bsminfo.com/doc/security-concerns-will-dominate-payments-space-in-0001 

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10
Jan
0

How Using an EMV Payment Gateway Saves Time and Money

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How Using an EMV Payment Gateway Saves Time and Money

 
If you are like most self-service kiosk providers EMV has been a hot topic around the office for the last year or so. With the coming liability shift in October 2015 kiosk software providers and kiosk owner/operators are sifting through all the information available online to figure out their best approach to EMV migration. 
 
The two options are fairly straight forward, but what the complexity and cost of the the options are less so. This blog post aims at giving you an understanding of the challenges and benefits of both.
 
The direct integration with a processor/acquiring bank approach:
 
Depending on your business model and operating cash this approach may be suitable for you. If you maintain ownership of all the kiosks in you fleet and want them all to share the same merchant account, a direct integration may work for you. However, if you sell or lease your kiosk solution and intend for your client to own the merchant account associated with the kiosk this may not be the best or most marketable solution. Your clients may want the flexibility to choose the processor they work with. Clients may already have a merchant account with a processor and they would like to add the kiosk to it. With a direct integration your clients won’t have that option and will be required to use the processor or processors you have integrated with. 
 
In addition to the restrictive nature of doing a direct integration with only one or two processors, there is also the time and cost associated with building the solution from scratch. You will need to pick one or more hardware terminals and find a suitable software architect. Programmers capable of creating a custom direct integration do not come cheap. The person you hire or contract to do the work will need to be a PCI and EMV expert. Historically this phase one process will take 3+ months, and come with a price tag well into the tens of thousands of dollars. Phase two involves hiring a third party QSA (Qualified Security Accessor) to evaluate the solution and confirm that it meets current PCI-DSS and PA-DSS requirements. Phase two also comes with a hefty price tag.  After the solution is created and evaluated by a QSA, there still remains the phase three task of certifying your new payment application with each payment device you plan to use, with each of the processors individually. Each processor you plan to integrate with will require their own evaluation and certification, and this too comes with a fee well into the thousands. It is reasonable to expect phase three to take at a minimum three months with each processor. As we approach the EMV liability shift in the US, the queues for certification with the various processors are getting longer and longer. Since most of the processors don’t have their own EMV infrastructure finalized, certifications have not yet begun in most cases. In reality, if you aren’t already engaged in the phase one process you are likely a year or more away from your goal of achieving EMV payment processing. 
 
While evaluating this as your best method of achieving EMV payment processing, you should also keep in mind that your integration will need to be reevaluated and certified every three years. So take everything stated above, “rinse and repeat” every 36 months! 
 
The EMV payment gateway approach:
 
There are a number payment gateway products on the market to choose from. CreditCall offers a processor agnostic, PCI pre-certified solution called ChipDNA that easily integrates with your existing Windows or Linux based application. ChipDNA removes the need to hire or contract a costly software architect who is well versed in PCI and EMV requirements. Their ChipDNA product supports a number of both attended and unattended hardware devices. Using ChipDNA can make your migration to EMV as easy as picking a piece of hardware, integrating the ChipDNA API with your application, and setting up a merchant account. You will never need to worry about re-certifying the solution either. CreditCall re-certifies their solution annually, so you don’t have to. ChipDNA's Terminal Maintenance System (TMS) ensures your terminal is always up to date with the latest PCI requirements. 
 
ChipDNA is integrated with the largest payment processors in North America, giving you and your clients the flexibility to choose the processor that is best for you. ChipDNA’s feature, EMV Easy Start, enables you to deploy EMV ready hardware now, and run transactions via the magnetic stripe reader of the terminal until such time that your chosen processor is ready to begin processing EMV transactions. A simple remote update is all it takes to change the terminal’s default from magnetic stripe to chip, a concept referred to as “EMV future-proofing."
 
With ChipDNA also comes WEBMIS, CreditCall's online account reconciliation portal. Through WEBMIS you can view transactions in real time and create groupings of terminals based on your own criteria. WEBMIS also offers Simple Object Access Protocol (SOAP) which will allow you to port transactional information into a backend accounting section of your application. 
 
Consistent with their culture of innovation, CreditCall announced on January 8th, 2015 that they now provide for download a preview version of their SDK called ChipDNA Lite. You can now try it before you buy it. Using this sample SDK you can begin evaluating how easy they can make your EMV migration. Contact us today to learn more! 
 
Rob Chilcoat
“Chip and PIN Kiosk Hardware”
UCP Inc.
(702) 802-3504 Tel
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
 
Visit us at NRF! Ingenico booth# 1743.
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29
Dec
0

Unattended Card Payments Inc. to attend NRF as Ingenico VAR

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UCP Inc. will be attending the 104th Annual National Retail Federation's "Big Show” as a Value Added Reseller of the Ingenico iSelf product line. We will be in the Ingenico Group booth (#1743). Come by the booth for information on the latest in attended and unattended EMV compliant payment hardware. Let us be your EMV experts and guide you through the complexity of readying your self-service solution before the coming 2015 EMV liability shift. We can offer comprehensive consulting on the hardware and software solutions that best meet your requirements. We can help you reduce the time and cost associated with migrating your solution from traditional magnetic stripe transaction processing to the future of EMV smart card and mobile payment acceptance at self-service kiosks. 

 
UCP’s parent company, Hemisphere West Europe (www.hweurope.com), has been selling EMV compliant unattended payment hardware and gateway services since the adoption of the technology in the UK, and throughout Europe. With a wealth of knowledge and experience stemming from our parent company, UCP is in uniquely positioned to offer advice to US companies looking to future-proof their solutions today for compliance with the coming standards in card holder data security (PCI-DSS). 
 
To set up a time to meet at the show please e-mail This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or call (702) 802-3504.
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02
Dec
0

EMV on CBS 60 Minutes

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Last night on 60 Minutes there was a segment on credit card fraud in America. The news segment included interviews with some interesting industry professionals. The first interview was with Dave Dewalt, CEO of FireEye. Mr. Dewalt said that 97% of companies experience security breaches. I don’t believe that the security breaches Mr. Dewalt is talking about in this statistic are solely financial in nature. However it does make one stop and think about securing card holder data. Breaches of this variety cary penalties in the millions, and also represents a significant financial burden to card issuing banks as well. Mr. Dewalt also confirms a statement by the interviewer, Bill Whitaker, that the average time between infection and detection of malicious software on company networks is 229 days! FireEye is an interesting cyber security company worth checking out; if even only for the  live Cyber Threat Map on their homepage. (www.fireeye.com

 
Brian Kerbs was also interviewed for the segment. He writes a cyber security blog read by many professionals within the financial arena. (www.kerbsonsecurity.com) A part of what Mr. Kerbs does is search the dark corners of the internet where batches of credit card data called “dumps" are available for purchase. He often is the first one aware of security breaches and has alerted many companies to breaches that had gone undetected. Using these dumps and some fairly accessible card stock, and printing/encoding hardware, a person with some intermediate computer skills would have all they need to start swiping and signing on a victim's account.
 
Another interesting contributor to the segment was Mallory Duncan, Sr. VP and General Council, at the National Retail Federation. (www.nrf.com) His comments went right to the heart of the problem for retail merchants and issuing banks. He can be quoted as saying that our current magnetic stripe cards are the “underlying problem,” and that they are “fundamentally fraud prone.” The light at the end of the tunnel for banks and merchants is the EMV chip card. Finally, because of newer cryptography methods, and the inclusion of a more secure card holder verification method; it will be nearly impossible for cyber thieves to breach networks and steal usable data to the extent they are now. The biggest benefit to the bank that issued the card is that updates can be sent to the chip on the card every time it is inserted into a terminal. The ability to update user’s cards in this fashion does away with the financial and logistical hardship of having to send out new magnetic stripe cards every time a possible breach occurs. 
 
We have seen what implementing EMV in other regions of the world has done to fight fraud. This time next year it will be interesting to see how the number of fraudulent transactions and breaches involving stolen credit card data stacks up against 2014’s numbers. 
 
The entire 60 Minutes segment and transcript can be viewed here.
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21
Nov
1

CreditCall's Jeremy Gumbley's interview regarding EMV Migration for Business Solutions

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Jeremy Gumbley, CTO of Creditcall, tells how the U.S. compares to other countries’ progress in their EMV migration at a year before the deadline, as well as what IT solutions providers should be doing for their customers now.

Q: Our readers’ merchant customers have until October 2015 to implement EMV-enabled systems to avoid responsibility for fraudulent payment card transactions. Can you explain how that date and the upcoming shift in liability originated?

Gumbley: The October 2015 Liability Shift deadline was a joint effort created by payments brands in the U.S. In August 2011, Visa announced its plan to speed up EMV migration in the U.S. by implementing retailer incentives, processing infrastructure acceptance requirements and a counterfeit card liability shift. Shortly after that, MasterCard, Discover, and American Express announced their roadmaps to EMV in the U.S. with an agreed liability shift deadline of October 2015.

The main driver behind the push towards EMV acceptance in the U.S. is the technology’s ability to combat fraud.  

Q: Is this a similar pattern that took place in other countries during EMV adoption?

Gumbley: Many countries around the world that have successfully migrated to EMV, implemented a deadline for their migration — a major difference is that the U.S.’ liability shift comes, in some cases, 10 years behind other countries.

In the U.S., while October 2015 marks the date when merchants will be liable for the costs associated with fraud if they have not updated their technology to be EMV compatible, the transition is not mandatory. After October 2015, merchants who choose not to update their payment systems to the new EMV technology will be liable to cover the potential costs of fraudulent transactions caused by mag-stripe cards.

A similar pattern took place during the UK’s migration to EMV. While the liability shift came into action in January 2005, it became a mandatory process to accept EMV chip cards as of February 14, 2006. Retailers were advised to expect credit card brands to decline payments automatically if a chip and PIN card was not used in the transaction. 

There is still a potential for the move to EMV chip card technology to become a mandatory process in the U.S. in the future.

Q: Based on history, how does the U.S. compare to adoption one year before that date?

Gumbley: With the liability shift coming into place in less than 12 months, there doesn’t seem to be much sense of urgency amongst integrators, ISVs, and VARs to migrate their solution to the EMV chip-card standard, despite development times taking an average of 22 months.

One year ahead of the liability shift in the U.S., we are not seeing a lot of consumer education programs. The UK employed a chip and PIN rollout campaign to educate consumers about the new technology. The campaign was centered around the slogan “I ♥ PIN”— a fitting slogan as Valentine’s Day, February 14, was the date that shoppers were required to enter their PIN, as opposed to verifying via signature, when using their chip and PIN cards.

However, consumers are becoming more aware as many large retailers have been affected very publicly by breaches including the likes of Home Depot, Michaels, Neiman Marcus, and most famously, Target. In a bid to stay out of the headlines, many retailers are quickly adopting the new technology — I predict that if the current momentum continues that by the liability shift, more than half of retailers will be able to accept EMV payments. When customers increasingly begin to use their chip cards at retailers, it will continue to drive adoption elsewhere.

Q: What is impeding adoption?

Gumbley: The central question surrounding EMV Migration in the U.S. is why has it taken so long for the world’s largest industrialized country to adopt EMV? The cost and sheer scale of implementation, especially for a country as vast as the U.S, are major factors affecting the speed of migration. This includes the issuance of new EMV-chip debit and credit cards as well as the upgrade of all payment terminals to the EMV standard.  Software developers charged with creating EMV-ready solutions are overwhelmed by the volume of information they need to digest and the complexity of EMV.

Q: As trusted advisors, what can retail VARs do to ensure their customers have every chance of having an EMV-enabled system by next October?

Gumbley: The most vital piece of advice for retail VARs is to start the process of migrating payment systems to EMV now.  From start to finish, upgrading a payment system to the EMV standard can take up to 22 months. This means to be ready for the October 2015 deadline, VARs should have started with their EMV migration process back in January 2014.  

To help VARs accelerate the EMV Migration process by reducing risk, operational resources and necessary skill, they need to join forces with experienced EMV-ready partners (like Creditcall) who offer pre-certified solutions which will significantly reduce the amount of time and effort to get up and running.

Without a pre-certified solution, retail VARs need to consider five steps:

  1. Select an appropriate PIN pad or card reader and develop a robust and reliable driver for it. This takes on average three months per PIN pad.
  2. Update all existing processor interfaces to support the new EMV requirements. This can take up to six months. With the October 2015 deadline approaching quickly, you must consider the demand for processor support requests in the run-up which could cause bottle necks, delaying the process even further.
  3. Get all the major card scheme certifications such as MasterCard M-TIP, Visa ADVT, American Express AEIPS or Discover DPAS. These take approximately four months and have to be repeated for every PIN pad and processor combination. If you support three PIN pads and three different processors you will need to schedule 144 weeks to obtain these certifications.
  4. Create a Terminal Management System (TMS) to keep PIN pads compliant and up to date by running the latest version of the EMV standard. A TMS enables this remotely, if an estate of PIN pads cannot be updated manually. PIN pads that don’t run the latest software or configuration are not compliant meaning merchants can be fined by the card brands which is passed down to them by their processor.
  5. Include support for point-to-point encryption (P2PE) as in combination with EMV your solution will be future proofed and provide the safest payment system available.

Jeremy Gumbley is a veteran of the payments industry having driven product and technology development roadmaps to accommodate EMV migration programs in the UK, Europe, Africa and the Middle East as well as the U.S. and Canada. Gumbley has driven Creditcall’s technical development since 1999 and was appointed chief technical officer and technical director in 2001.

He is responsible for the design, development and implementation of the company’s market leading card payment solutions and portfolio of EMV Level 2 Kernels. Creditcall has licensed and deployed over 1 million Kernels over the last 10 years. In addition, Gumbley oversees the maintenance of the company’s PCI DSS Level 1 compliance.

 

LINK TO ORIGINAL CONTENT: http://www.bsminfo.com/doc/creditcall-cto-migrate-systems-to-emv-now-0001

 
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12
Nov
0

UCP Inc. interviewed for recent article on Retail Customer Experience

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UCP Inc. was recently interviewed for an article on the importance of being EMV ready in 2015. You can read the full article here:

Six Tips for becoming EMV Compliant

 

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31
Oct
0

UCP will be at CETW 2014 in New York

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Unattended Card Payments Inc. will be attending CETW next week in New York. If you will be attending and would like to learn more about EMV in North America shoot us an email at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or call 702-802-3504 to set up a meeting.UCP Logo

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17
Oct
0

EMV readiness in Transportation

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This week we had the opportunity to attend the nations largest transportation show, APTA. This show happens only once every three years so just about everyone shows up. Bus and train manufacturers, toll and fare collection solution providers, transit tracking, and mobile computers are just a few of the products featured at the APTA show this year. All over the show floor I found numerous examples of manufacturers offering EMV ready solutions. Since UCP specializes in EMV for the US market we were happy to see that a lot of the self-service solutions being shown were already equipped with EMV compliant hardware. 

 

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09
Oct
0

Acronyms in EMV: What do they all mean? Edition 3 SRED

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Secure Read and Exchange of Data, SRED is a set of criteria that PIN entry and card reader devices are tested against. Manufacturers submit complete prototypes of terminals and other payment devices for SRED evaluation. SRED ensures that cardholder data is protected from the point of acceptance, and lays the larger foundation for point-to-point encryption (P2PE). There is specific SRED criteria for terminals installed in attended versus unattended environments. SRED devices are also equipped with tamper sensors and switches meant to guard against physical security breaches at the terminal level. Additional security requirements are listed for unattended hardware like that installed in self-service kiosks or fuel dispensers. These additional security measures help ensure merchants that the level of security is not degraded in unattended environments.

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09
Oct
0

UCP Attending APTA 2014 in Houston

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UCP Inc. will be attending the biggest transportation show in the United States. APTA happens once every three years and is the premier trade show for those concerned with the transportation industry. We will be onsite with information regarding implementing EMV payment systems in North America. If you will be attending APTA and have questions about EMV or Chip and PIN in the Americas let us know and we can set up a time to meet. You can call us at 702-802-3504 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

For more information about APTA you can visit their website. www.aptaexpo.com

 

APTA logo

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29
Sep
0

Acronyms in EMV: What do they all mean? Edition 2 CVM

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In this edition we will touch briefly on CVM, which stands for "Cardholder Verification Method". A Cardholder Verification Method is what is used to verify the identity of a person making a purchase. There are a number of different ways to do it, most commonly a signature is used. In order for a signature to be an acceptable CVM the transaction should be attended by a representative who can verify the signature's authenticity by means of comparing it to a drivers license or other ID. In the unattended space, the most common and industry acceptable standard is by having the user enter a PIN via a secure entry device. A CVM is not always required however, and there have been other options used such as biometric readers. You may have noticed that certain larger retailers don't require a signature for low dollar value purchases. The same can be true of unattended kiosks. The dollar figures and requirements surrounding when and what type of CVM should be used can be found through various online outlets, however the acquirer/processor will have a major stake in what they consider acceptable. Always check with your processor, it is a good rule of thumb regarding CVM requirements for chip, chip and pin, or contactless (NFC) transactions such as Google Wallet or Apple Pay. 

Google Wallet is a registered trademark of Google.

Apple Pay is a registered trademark of Apple Inc. 

 

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22
Sep
0

Acronyms in EMV: What do they all mean? Edition 1

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For the first edition in this series of blog posts we will start with the first and most important acronym, EMV. EMV stands for Europay MasterCard Visa. EMV is a global specification regarding the use of chip card technology for the credit card payment industry. EMV was established to ensure interoperability and acceptance of payment systems Integrated Circuit Cards on a worldwide level. The acronym is derived from the names of the three organizations that originally collaborated on the specification. The regulatory organization that provides certifications and ongoing updates regarding the EMV standard is called EMVCo. (www.emvco.com) Visit their website to learn more about specifications for chip and pin, contactless, tokenization, and other items of interest. Their website is an excellent source of information about the future of credit card acceptance worldwide.  

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17
Sep
0

UCP attending EMV Migration Forum workshop in Oak Brook IL

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UCP will be attending the EMV Migration Forum workshop on September 26th 2014. We are excited to be attending the workshop to further our position as an industry consultant and provider of EMV compliant chip and pin hardware and gateway solutions for the North American market. This one day workshop will include the following session topics:

-Why EMV Now in the U.S.

-EMV 101

-Development Preparation

-Payment Security Standards

-Implementation Best Practices and Considerations

-Testing and Best Practices

The workshop is open to non-forum member VARs, ISVs, and ISOs. We encourage any interested parties to attend, but if you can't make it you can continue to count on UCP for up to date information on the changing landscape of credit card acceptance in North America. 

 

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16
Sep
0

Welcome to the UCP-Inc blog

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Coming soon.

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Our Partners


Hemisphere West Europe Ltd are specialists in attended and unattended payment solutions for the UK and European markets.

Visit website www.hweurope.com

Contact Us

6655 South Tenaya Way Suite #180
    Las Vegas, Nevada 89113

Tel: 702 – 802 – 3504

E-mail: Send Inquiry